TO LUCASTA ESSAY

Taylor Doan February 28, at 9: He pleads with her, telling her not to think poorly of him after he leaves the peacefulness that surrounds her and flies off into the brutal and violent world of war. The second stanza takes on a different tone than the first. By sexualizing the elements of war and turning it into a source of alternate pursuit for romantic fulfillment he is currently not receiving, the speaker subtly insults the lover he is leaving—she is a less attractive option than potential death in war. A sword, a horse, a shield. Lovelace was an English poet who lived in the early s.

Newer Post Older Post Home. Read the entries under Theme. The only thing I would comment on, would be to relate this poem back to the novels you read by David Foster Walace, both thematically and stylistically. The second stanza takes on a different tone than the first. By explicitly associated those two, he acknowledges what going off to war will seem like or feel like to the woman and, consequently, any friction between the man and woman is somewhat decreased because he allows her anger. The speaker of the poem, possibly Lovelace himself, since he was a soldier, speaks directly to his lover throughout.

Implied comparison of Honour to a beloved woman. He pleads with her, telling her not to think poorly of him after he leaves the peacefulness that surrounds her and flies off into the brutal and violent world of war.

to lucasta essay

True, a new mistress now I chase, The first foe in the field; And with a stronger faith embrace A sword, a horse, a shield. The first thing I noticed was that you directly went into your thesis.

Analysis of To Lucasta, Going to the Wars by Richard Lovelace

And with a stronger faith embrace. Another thing you do nicely, not only in this particular essay, but in general as well, is use elevated diction. Following are examples of figures of speech in the poem. I could not love thee, Dear, so much. Lovelace held inherited estates in Kent and freely used his personal resources to support the king’s causes.

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He could not love her as much lcuasta he does, he says, if he dishonored himself by failing to answer the call to duty. To Althea, from Prison by Richard Lovelace. By explicitly associated those two, he acknowledges what going off to war will seem like or feel like to the woman and, consequently, any friction between the man and woman is somewhat decreased because he allows her anger.

In each stanza the first line rhymes with the third and the second with the fourth. Examples of rhyming sounds within are the following: Even though he has compared his relationship with war to a new paramour that is ultimately more attractive than his lover, he is still, in departure, trying to state that he loves her and is worthy of her respect and admiration, suggesting that his leaving of her is indicative the honor inherent in his character.

I really enjoyed reading this essay and took lucsta lot away from it that I hope to use in my own writing as well. This is great because it really builds your credibility and the audience can trust what you have to say.

Type of Work, Publication.

A Short Analysis of Richard Lovelace’s ‘To Lucasta, Going to the Wars’

Read the following poem carefully. You also stray from the typical 5 paragraph essay and make it completely unique. Newer Post Older Post Home. War, combat; the enemy. The poem also has a set rhyme scheme, which has the following pattern: In this stanza, Lovelace admits that he is devoted to someone else: What appeared to be formalities, or even genuine niceties, was in fact an insult to his victims — Wargrave recognized their lack of suspicion and capitalized on what must have seemed like an amusing situation.

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I could not love thee, Dear, so much, Read the entries under Theme.

to lucasta essay

In the first stanza, the speaker is begging his lover not to think he is rude for leaving her. Sadly, Lucy thought Lovelace had perished in battle, and she married another man.

Subscribe to Blog via Email Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email. It was first published in in To Lucastaa collection of Lovelace’s poems. While the identity of Lucasta is not known, many suspect Lovelace wrote this poem for a woman, Lucy Sacheverell, with whom he was very much in love.

A sword, a horse, a shield. Lovelace probably implemented this to put an emphasis on how eager the speaker is to get to the battlefield. The first foe in the field Comparison of the enemy to a mistress.